Home > Club Big: Feb 24 2017

Club Big: Feb 24 2017

At the centre of John Hyatt: Rock Art is Club Big, a fully kitted-out pop-up music club. John Hyatt is your magical master of ceremonies, introducing the best breakthrough live music and performance every Friday from 18:00 – 21:00. Hosting bands, soloists, the supernatural and the dramatic and featuring the Club Big House Band (provided by Cacophany Arkestra), our host Anastasia, and fully licensed bar. All events are free to attend.

Our line-up for Friday Feb 24 is:

17:55 – 18:15 – House Band
18:30 – 19:00 – Robin Nature-Bold with Simon Woolham
19:00 – 19:45 – Inland Taipan
20:00 – 20:40 – Emrys Morgan

More about the artists:

Robin Nature-Bold with Simon Woolham

Robin Nature-Bold will soon be pulled out of retirement and hugging his porcelain pissoir, kept in check by Simon Woolham’s alter-ego ‘The Careworker’. Here Robin will perform his own acoustic renditions of other musician’s songs, as a homage to Prof. John Hyatt and in particular the love of art, though these will be peppered with anecdotal recollections of his past glories. Now a dishevelled shadow of his post-punk years, Robin portrays a sorry figure. Often assisted by The Care Worker to correct, support and sometimes overshadow him. Other special guests will also assist Robin on the night, as he struggles to perform from his wheelchair.

Emrys Morgan – Theatre of Nothing

Emrys Morgan’s first public performance was in 1974 – ‘The American Invasion of Piccadilly Gardens’. Since then he has presented work, often working collaboratively with other artists and groups, in and outside the gallery system from the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh, a harbour in Norway, the Hacienda in Manchester and in numerous locations/venues from Russia to the United States and places in between. His work in the visual arts manifests itself across the disciplines and he has also organised public art events/festivals, galleries and artist studios/residencies.

Inland Taipan

Taking the name from what is considered the most venomous snake in the world, Inland Taipan’s performance has parallels to the fierce reptile. Reminiscent of Jeff Buckley and PJ Harvey, the performance is often angry, and at time, disarming in its tenderness. Lyricism covers topics ranging from economic decline in 1930’s America, to butchering an ex-lover and feeding the corpse to the family… Haunting, ethereal vocals are underpinned by classical guitar techniques, as songs erupt into coarse bluesy riffs.